Swedish Armed Forces highly ranked among the public

The percentage of the general public who are confident or very confident in the Swedish Armed Forces has increased from 36 per cent in 2016 to 63 per cent in 2021. This is evident from the yearly poll of public confidence in government agencies, political parties, media and corporations.

People have become more aware of the Armed Forces’ capability, not least through the support to the national health care service during the pandemic, and to the rescue service in the forest fires, says Johan Orbe at Kantar Sifo who is in charge of this year’s confidence poll.
People have become more aware of the Armed Forces’ capability, not least through the support to the national health care service during the pandemic, and to the rescue service in the forest fires, says Johan Orbe at Kantar Sifo who is in charge of this year’s confidence poll. Photo: Jimmy Croona/Swedish Armed Forces

“The increase of public confidence in the Armed Forces is unique compared to that of other government agencies”, says Johan Orbe at Kantar Sifo, who has carried out the survey.

The Swedish Tax Agency and the Secret Service rank just above the Armed Forces, but they have always been highly ranked. No other government agency has come as far as the Armed Forces, according to Johan Orbe.

“There are many reasons for that. One of them is the growing unrest in the world and the fact that the Armed Forces has switched from international to national focus, another is that the image of the Armed Forces has changed with the recruitment campaigns.

“I also think that people have become more aware of the Armed Forces’ capability, not least through the support to the national health care service during the pandemic, and to the rescue service in the forest fires”, he says.

“The Supreme Commander has also appeared more frequently in the media lately. The leadership level in organisations often have great impact on public opinion”, says Johan Orbe.

Opinion polls of confidence have been conducted yearly since 1997. This year’s survey comprises 1 206 web-based interviews with individuals aged 16 and above.