• Soldiers in ArvidsjaurPhoto: Jimmy Croona/Swedish Armed Forces

About the Swedish Armed Forces

The Swedish Armed Forces is subject to the Swedish parliament and the Swedish government. As an authority we are governed by laws and regulations passed by them and they also determine the budget we receive. Each year the Swedish Armed Forces also receive a so-called letter of regulation from the government. This sets out in detail what the authority is required to do during the year.

The Swedish Armed Forces is one of the biggest authorities in Sweden and is headed by a Supreme Commander. The deputy leader of the authority is the Director General.

As the only authority permitted to engage in armed combat, the Swedish Armed Forces are Sweden’s ultimate security policy resource. The Armed Forces are therefore always prepared to carry out international missions, assert Sweden’s national integrity and support Swedish society in major crises. To enable Sweden to maintain its freedom of action in terms of its security policy, the Armed Forces are continuously developing capabilities that can meet future requirements.

Today’s crises and conflicts arise quickly and do not respect national boundaries. Sweden has worked for peace and democracy for over fifty years in cooperation with different multinational organisations, and today we are expanding this work to an increasing degree.

Over the past few years, the Swedish Armed Forces has started undergoing a major process of change. We are creating a modern mission-based armed force with smaller, more focused units that can be deployed directed where they are needed, in both Sweden and abroad. The changes being implemented within the Swedish Armed Forces are in line with similar developments in other countries. Today’s threats, the general security policy situation and the way wars are being waged have changed dramatically over the past twenty years.

In order to fulfil its responsibilities, the Swedish Armed Forces is allocated around SEK 40 billion each year. Of this funding, around half goes to unit operations, and half to research, development and materials systems.

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